athletes read to JB

SMC Athletes Partner with Jesse Bobo Elementary

What does a 6’9” 18 year old have in common with a 4’ 6 year old? 

A book. 

Over the past year Spartanburg Methodist College has partnered with its neighbor Jesse Bobo Elementary School to bring an early morning reading program to students who arrive for early breakfast.  Five SMC athletic teams (Men’s and Women’s Basketball, Baseball, Softball, and Wrestling) along with members of the SMC faculty and staff met Jesse Bobo students in the library, classrooms, and gym to share their favorite books.  “Our athletes were barely awake when they arrived at Jesse Bobo at 7:00 in the morning; but, as soon as the children arrived our students came alive and enjoyed the morning just as much as the Bobo Bears.  I am proud that these young men and women were willing to get up so early to show our young neighbors how important reading and an education are to success,” stated SMC President, Dr. Colleen P. Keith.  

baseball reunion

SMC welcomes back the 1964 Spartanburg Junior College Baseball Team

Spartanburg Methodist College is pleased to announce the 1964 Spartanburg Junior College Baseball team will be holding their 50th Reunion in Spartanburg on Friday, April 4th and Saturday, April 5th.

“Welcoming these former players back to campus is very special to us at SMC. We want them to know they always have a home here, and we want them to feel connected to today’s baseball Pioneers,” shared SMC President Dr. Colleen Perry Keith.

Confirmed players from the 1964 team,  led by Coach Jimmy York, who passed away several years ago, who will be attending include, David Boyter, Candler, NC; Jantzen Childers, Union, SC; Joe Cox, Moore, SC; Frank Mathis, Greer, SC; Tommy White, Sumter, SC; and Neil “Hank” Rogers, Phil Holden and Don Tate, Spartanburg, SC. 

This elite group of athletes will kick off their weekend with a Managers Reception at Comfort Suites, in memory of former team members:  Jimmy York, coach, Clark Owens, manager, Keith Crow, and Walter Irick.  The reception, which will feature a welcome by current SMC Baseball Coach Tim Wallace and SMC President Colleen Perry Keith will be followed by dinner at Buffalo Wild Wings.  The reunion festivities will culminate with former players attending and being recognized at the SMC Baseball double header with USC Sumter on Saturday at 1 p.m.   Former catcher, Tommy White will throw out the first pitch. 

SMC_Seal Reflex Blue

Spartanburg Methodist College announces Summer Sessions

Spartanburg Methodist College is pleased to announce their Summer College Sessions and course offerings.  Session I will be held from May 28 to June 27, 2014 and Session II, an ALL ON-LINE program of study, will be held from July 7 to August 1, 2014.

“Summer classes provide an excellent opportunity for Upstate residents to take either that first college step, or return to the college classroom,” shared Dr. Colleen Perry Keith, President of SMC. “Our coursework is highly transferrable, so students who attend college elsewhere and plan to spend the summer at home can take courses here without worry about transferring coursework. We have strong articulation agreements with over 200 colleges and universities and are happy to work with students to ensure a smooth transition.”

According to data from the 2012 US Census, 31.5% of Spartanburg residents have only attained a high school diploma and 19.9% have some college, compared to 29.8% and 21.1% respectively in South Carolina, and 28.0% and 21.3% in the United States.

The earnings gap between young adults with and without bachelor’s degrees has stretched to its widest level in nearly half a century. It’s a sign of the growing value of a college education despite rising tuition costs, according to a recent analysis of census data. Young adults with just a high-school diploma earned 62 percent of the typical salary of college graduates. That’s down from 81 percent in 1965, the earliest year for which comparable data are available.

The analysis by the Pew Research Center shows the increasing economic difficulties for young adults who lack a bachelor’s degree in today’s economy that is polarized between high- and low-wage work. As a whole, high-school graduates were more likely to live in poverty and be dissatisfied with their jobs, if not unemployed.

In contrast, roughly nine in 10 college graduates ages 25 to 32 said that their bachelor’s degree had paid off or will pay off in the future, according to Pew’s separate polling conducted last year. Even among the two-thirds of young adults who borrowed money for college, about 86 percent said their degrees have been, or will be, worth it. ‘‘In today’s knowledge-based economy, the only thing more expensive than getting a college education is not getting one,’’ said Paul Taylor, Pew’s executive vice president and co-author of the report.*

SMC’s summer college provides the unique opportunity for students to accelerate their graduation date and to explore subjects they did not have the opportunity to take during the academic year. SMC’s summer college is also available to students from other campuses who wish to transfer credit back to their home institution. Students may take up to two (3 hr. or 4 hr.) courses and a physical education course in Session I.  Students may take up to two courses in Session II.

Session I includes the following  course offerings: English Composition I, Microbiology, Astronomy and Physics, Public Speaking, Principles of Biology I, Drama Appreciation, First Aid & Personal Safety, General Psychology, Readings in World Literature, English Composition II, Health Education, Introductory Statistics, Western Civilization I, and Jogging.

Session II, an all online program of study, includes the following course offerings:  US History I, Intro to Computer Science, New Testament and American Literature II

Tuition is $225.00 per credit hour.  The cost of books and supplies will vary by course and course load. Information regarding costs and financial aid may be obtained by contacting the Admissions Office at 864-587-4213, or the Financial Aid Office at 864-587-4298.

Room and Board costs for Session I are $985.00. Meals are available Monday-Friday. Residence halls are open seven days a week during the term. Residence halls will open for student check-in on Tuesday, May 27, 2014, between 3:00 pm-5:00 pm. Residence halls will close at 5:00 pm on June 27.  Residence facilities are not available for Session II.

More information about opportunities available through the SMC Summer School program may be obtained by calling the Office of Admissions at Spartanburg Methodist College at (864) 587-4213 or 1-800-772-7286 or by visiting http://www.smcsc.edu/summer-session-info/

Spartanburg Village

SMC to be part of Spartanburg Village Network’s Education forum – 3/6 at 6 p.m.

The Spartanburg Village Network, known as The Village Network, began about two years ago with members from churches, civic groups and professions. The group started as a way for people to support and get to know each other but developed into something more over time.

Members started focusing on ways they could unite and make a difference in the community. The goal is to come up with ways to help families in areas ranging from education to finances.

After weeks of planning, the group has scheduled its first community forum at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Spartanburg Community College-Downtown Campus. The forum is titled “It Takes A Village: From the Cradle to Career An Education Conversation.”

Leon Wiles, chief diversity officer at Clemson University and a former University of South Carolina Upstate vice chancellor, will serve as moderator. Panelists include Molly Talbot-Metz, vice president of programs at the Mary Black Foundation, Spartanburg Methodist College President Colleen P. Keith and Herb Johnson, Jr., vice president and chief diversity officer of Michelin North America. Other panelists include John Stockwell, executive director of Spartanburg Academic Movement and former chancellor of USC Upstate, Jil Littlejohn, president of the Urban League of the Upstate and Spartanburg District 7 Superintendent Russell Booker, who is also vice chairman of The Village Network.
If we are going to move the needle for graduation rates, then we need to focus on the African-American community,” Booker said. “This is a pretty strong and diverse panel. We wanted education to be the topic of our first forum. The event is open to everyone because it is going to take the entire community to make a difference.”

Booker said the education forum will outline programs available to help prepare children before they begin school and while they are in school. He also said the forum will help residents learn more about the importance of education.

“The idea is to share information and talk about the challenges of education,” Booker said. “This forum also will talk about the successes because that is just as important as talking about the challenges. There is so much going on that we want people to know what is happening in the community.”

Future plans are to hold discussions on health and wellness and financial planning. Organizers don’t plan to stop after offering a few forums. They hope to continue working on issues in the community and encourage other people to join them in the effort.

The Village Network organizers say their mission is “to unite a committed leadership base focused on educating, engaging and inspiring local families.” The other part of the vision is to focus attention on resources and programs that have the most potential in helping local families.

The Rev. Keith McDaniel, chairman of The Village Network and senior pastor of Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church, said he is excited about the group’s first event. He said members spent time looking at ways they could help others.

“We have too many families struggling with education, housing, health and other issues,” he said. “The village concept comes from the African proverb that it takes a village to raise a child, and we have applied that to leadership. It takes more than one leader to lead a community.”