SMC provides a wide range of activities that are fun and encourage students to meet one another. Student activities are planned and organized by POPS (People Organizing Programs Successfully). POPS is a great leadership opportunity that allows students to take part in programming and planning campus activities and social events.
Check out POPS on Facebook
POPS on Facebook
Some of our annual events include the:
Freshmen Day of Service
SMC Idol Competition
Homecoming / Family Day
Another recent event which the SMC Student Activities office coordinated along with faculty, staff and student leaders from across campus is The Jeremy Vangsnes 5K Benefit Run.
For more information on any of these programs, contact the Office of Student Activities and Leadership Developmen,t Room 202 of the Burgess Student Center; phone (864) 587-4006.

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SMC students experience Mandala at Chapman Cultural Center

On Wednesday, October 2nd, Spartanburg Methodist College students left their desks and classrooms and traveled to the Chapman Cultural Arts Center in downtown Spartanburg to experience a once in a lifetime opportunity of watching and interacting with exiled Tibetan monks as they created a mandala.

Dr. Mark Gibbs, Chairperson of the Humanities Division and Professor of Religion and Philosophy, and Dr. Bethany Perkins, Professor of English, treated their respective Religion 103 and English 101 learning community classes with this educational opportunity.

The monks, of Drepung Loseling Monastery in Atlanta, visited Spartanburg and providing a transformative experience as they create a unique mandala sand painting in the Jennifer Evins lobby of the Chapman Theatre as part of the Mystical Arts of Tibet tour.  Originally established near Lhasa, Tibet, in 1416 and re-established in India after the monks were forced to flee Tibet in 1959, the North American seat of the monastery was established in Atlanta in 1990.  The tours, endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, contribute to world peace and healing through sacred art, generate awareness of the endangered Tibetan culture and raise money for the Tibetan refugee community in India.

Sand mandalas are constructed in a pain-staking method of Tantric Buddhist tradition, utilizing a metal funnel called a chakpur to make large circular designs.  Keeping in the Tantric Buddhist tradition, the process of creating a dul-tson-kyil-khor (mandala of colored powders) is used as a tool of re-consecrating the earth and its inhabitants. The experience is highly artistic and spiritual for both the monks and spectators. Creating, watching, or simply looking and thinking about the mandala serves as a meditative process.

Mandalas are symbolic representations of the cosmos (sometimes called “cosmograms”).  Over the course of 30 hours, the monks will draw out the initial design, then “paint” the mandala with millions of tiny grains.  In general, mandalas are created to alleviate suffering.  More specifically, they are created for the healing of all living things and the environment.

The mandala being created in Spartanburg symbolizes the need for compassion in our present age and is devoted to Chenrezig (also known as Avalokiteshvara) who is the Buddhist Bodhisattva of Compassion.  The designs within the mandala are ancient spiritual symbols.  The mandala is a formal geometric pattern showing the “floor plan” of a sacred mansion – a Buddha’s celestial palace – populated with enlightened beings; sort of an architectural drawing from a bird’s eye view.

Monks create and then dismantle mandalas in order to demonstrate the Buddhist teaching about the nature of impermanence.  Buddhists emphasize that human attachment to permanence and our avoidance of change inevitably lead to suffering.  Thus the destruction of the mandala becomes an object lesson in the Buddhist teaching, prompting observers to notice their own responses and question their relationship to material things, to beauty, and to change.

SMC freshman April Stratton summed up the day by saying “the mandalas were exquisite and beautiful.  It was amazing to see how the monks placed the sand to create symbols from their culture.  I am grateful to have gotten this experience.”

Dr. David Cox

SMC Psi Beta Chapter to present “Suicide: Is it an option?” on Thursday, October 31st

Spartanburg Methodist College’s Psi Beta Chapter is pleased to announce that Dr. David Cox, Author, Speaker and Christian Life Coach, will present “Suicide: Is it an option?” on Thursday, October 31st from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m. in the David Mission Chapel on the campus of SMC. The public is invited and admission is free of charge.

Dr. Cox holds a B.A. degree in Religion from Wofford College, and Master of Divinity and Doctor of Ministry degrees from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, NC. The focus of his doctoral work was counseling and suicide intervention.

As a part of his training, Dr. Cox completed a two-year clinical residency as a Hospital Chaplain at Spartanburg Regional Medical Center. In addition, Dr. Cox completed a three-year pastoral internship in the Pastoral Counseling Center of First Baptist Church of Spartanburg, South Carolina where Dr. Kirk H. Neely served as Mentor and Supervisor. While in graduate school, he also completed paramedic training and worked as a Senior Paramedic for Spartanburg EMS and was named South Carolina’s 1989 Paramedic of the Year.

Dr. Cox is an ordained minister. Having served various churches as a Youth Minister and Pastoral Counselor prior to entering private practice as a Christian Life Coach in 1992, he has helped numerous individuals, couples and families in crisis.  Dr. Cox served as an Expert Witness in the Susan Smith murder trial in Union, SC in 1995, giving testimony regarding the effects of suicide on surviving children. The BBC interviewed him for a suicide documentary about the Susan Smith case.

In 1997, he founded a local SOS (Survivors of Suicide) support group. He facilitated the group, which continues to meet monthly, until several years ago when he felt the need to devote a large block of time to writing a book to help survivors of suicide cope.  He has also served as a staff counselor for Wounded Heroes, now Wounded Ministers, a ministry of LifeWay to pastors. Dr. Cox was the Special Counselors Captain for the Upstate Carolina Festival 2001 with Franklin Graham.

Following the events of 9/11, he was the subject of an article on Family.org (Focus On The Family) concerning how to talk to children about the tragedy. On the one year anniversary, the article entitled, Help Children Cope, was reprinted in the Focus on the Family magazine. He also provided services in the aftermath of the shootings on the Virginia Tech campus that occurred on April 16, 2007.

He is coauthor with Candy Arrington of  AFTERSHOCK: Help, Hope, and Healing in the Wake of Suicide – Broadman & Holman Publishers – October 2003 and contributor to The Art of Helping – River Oak Publishers, 2003. In both 2004 and 2007, Dr. Cox was a radio guest on “Family Life Today” with Dennis Rainey.  He has appeared on the national television programs “Helpline” with Dr. Morris Cerullo and “Time for Hope” with Dr. Freda Crews. He hosted his own radio program, “Life Matters with Dr. David Cox,” from 2002 until 2012.

The SMC Psi Beta chapter, chartered on September 1, 1988, is under the direction of psychology professor Dr. Mary Jane Farmer, with assistance from Pete Aylor, psychology professor and Director of SMC’s Counseling Center, and college Counselor Sue Onken.  To date, there have been 376 SMC students who have achieved life-time membership to Psi Beta.

Membership to PSI BETA is by invitation only.  To be considered students must have at least 12 college credits, earn a B or higher in PSYC 101, maintain a 3.25 GPA and be of good moral character. Psi Beta provides students with opportunities to acquire leadership skills, interact with faculty outside the classroom, learn more about the professional and educational choices available in psychology, meet outstanding professionals in psychology, participate in community service, meet peers with similar interests, and be involved with Psi Beta on the national level.

SMC is South Carolina’s only private, residential college exclusively for freshmen and sophomore students and one of only four colleges in South Carolina affiliated with the United Methodist Church. SMC’s mission is to transform lives in a values-oriented, student-centered atmosphere in the Christian tradition that encourages academic excellence, intellectual exploration, social  awareness, and character development within the liberal arts tradition.  Spartanburg Methodist College, founded in 1911, is proud of its heritage of providing “the opportunity to be your best and the inspiration to do great things.”

Hope Blackley

SMC Psi Beta Chapter to present “The Ugly Face of Domestic Violence” on Thursday, October 17th

Spartanburg Methodist College’s Psi Beta Chapter is pleased to announce that Hope Blackley, Clerk of Court for Spartanburg County, will present “The Ugly Face of Domestic Violence” on Thursday, October 17th from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m. in the Gibbs Auditorium located within the Edgar H. Ellis Jr. Hall on the campus of SMC. The public is invited and admission is free of charge.

Blackley started her professional career working in the 7th Circuit Solicitor’s Office in 1997 as a Child Victim Advocate, where she assisted and prepared children for criminal court, directed bond court and restitution hearings.  In 2004, South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford appointed her Crime Victims’ Ombudsman for the state, where she investigated complaints made by crime victims against criminal and juvenile court systems.  On March 5, 2010, Governor Sanford, appointed Blackley to the position of Spartanburg County Clerk of Court, where she currently manages the day to day operations of the courthouse and court system.

Born and raised in Spartanburg, Blackley is a graduate of Dorman High School, an alumnus of South Carolina State University, a member of Cornerstone Baptist Church and serves on several boards such as Spartanburg Mobile Meals, United Way of the Piedmont, Converse College-Board of Visitors, SC Victim Service Coordinating Council and Carolina Pregnancy Center.

The SMC Psi Beta chapter, chartered on September 1, 1988, is under the direction of psychology professor Dr. Mary Jane Farmer, with assistance from Pete Aylor, psychology professor and Director of SMC’s Counseling Center, and college Counselor Sue Onken.  To date, there have been 376 SMC students who have achieved life-time membership to Psi Beta.

Membership to PSI BETA is by invitation only.  To be considered students must have at least 12 college credits, earn a B or higher in PSYC 101, maintain a 3.25 GPA and be of good moral character. Psi Beta provides students with opportunities to acquire leadership skills, interact with faculty outside the classroom, learn more about the professional and educational choices available in psychology, meet outstanding professionals in psychology, participate in community service, meet peers with similar interests, and be involved with Psi Beta on the national level.

 

Rev. Mike Royal

SMC Psi Beta Chapter to present “O daddy, where are you?” on Thursday, October 3rd

Spartanburg Methodist College’s Psi Beta Chapter is pleased to announce that the Rev. Mike Royal will present “O daddy, where are you?” Fatherhood & the Ills of Society on Thursday, October 3rd from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m. in the David Mission Chapel on the campus of SMC. The public is invited and admission is free of charge.

Rev. Royal is a graduate of Liberty University and has a Masters of Theology from Covington Seminary.  He has served in ministry for over 21 years working with students and parents, and currently serves as Senior Pastor at Eastside Baptist Church in Spartanburg, SC.  The SMC Psi Beta chapter, chartered on September 1, 1988, is under the direction of psychology professor Dr. Mary Jane Farmer, with assistance from Pete Aylor, psychology professor and Director of SMC’s Counseling Center, and college Counselor Sue Onken.  To date, there have been 376 SMC students who have achieved life-time membership to Psi Beta.

Membership to PSI BETA is by invitation only.  To be considered students must have at least 12 college credits, earn a B or higher in PSYC 101, maintain a 3.25 GPA and be of good moral character. Psi Beta provides students with opportunities to acquire leadership skills, interact with faculty outside the classroom, learn more about the professional and educational choices available in psychology, meet outstanding professionals in psychology, participate in community service, meet peers with similar interests, and be involved with Psi Beta on the national level.

DofE-Logo-2008

SMC to offer Duke of Edinburgh Young American’s Challenge Awards Program

Spartanburg Methodist College’s Office of Student Activities and Leadership Development is proud to offer a new awards program to students, The Duke of Edinburgh Young American’s Challenge.  Most societies across the globe place great pressure on young people to succeed academically, but the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award allows youth to develop character and integrity in a non-competitive environment.

The Four Tenants of the Award – Community Service, Physical Fitness, Special Skills, and Adventurous Journey – provide participants with a rare opportunity to better themselves while helping others. The Award program is an incredible growing experience for all who take the challenge to achieve this prestigious honor. Each participant’s Award initiatives are unique to their interests, ensuring the experience is enjoyable and worthwhile.  The Award attracts operational and corporate partners from around the world in recognition of the Award’s values and the incredible lessons it transcends to young people and to their own young corporate employees.

The Award is a unique, daring, and exciting self-development program available to all young people worldwide ages 14 to 25, equipping them with life skills to make a difference within themselves, their communities and the world.  The Award program enjoys success through:

·         Igniting passion and increasing motivation, which improves school attendance.

·         Developing skills and acknowledging achievement in non-academic settings.

·         Encouraging young people to make positive life choices by reducing their vulnerability to drugs, crime, anti-social behavior, HIV/AIDS, and obesity.

·         Instilling confidence and self-worth within every participant through fostering good self-esteem in a fun, nonthreatening atmosphere.

·         Introducing young people to the world around them by making participants aware of their individual contributions and showing how their efforts benefit others.

Over 7 million people from over 132 countries have been motivated to undertake a variety of voluntary and challenging activities through the International Award program.  The Award began in 1956 in the UK but has spread across the globe, and the fundamental philosophy and the Four Section operational format have proved resilient, attractive, and adaptable to many cultures, languages, and climates. The Award remains as relevant today as ever before and experiences record levels of interest each year. Last year, more than 140,000 participants earned a Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

SMC is currently recruiting students to participate.  Dedicated participants must spend 6 months completing the requirements for the award.   Information sessions will be held on Monday, September 30th at 5:30 pm and Wednesday, October 2nd at 3:30 pm in the Fireplace Room of the SMC Student Center.  For more information, contact Kim Caton at catonk@smcsc.edu or (864) 587-4006.

Two SMC students have received their Bronze medal for the Duke of Edinburgh award through the Miss South Carolina program.  Both Nacolle Williamson and Bonnie Walls participated during their reigns as Miss SMC.