Spartanburg Village

SMC to be part of Spartanburg Village Network’s Education forum – 3/6 at 6 p.m.

The Spartanburg Village Network, known as The Village Network, began about two years ago with members from churches, civic groups and professions. The group started as a way for people to support and get to know each other but developed into something more over time.

Members started focusing on ways they could unite and make a difference in the community. The goal is to come up with ways to help families in areas ranging from education to finances.

After weeks of planning, the group has scheduled its first community forum at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Spartanburg Community College-Downtown Campus. The forum is titled “It Takes A Village: From the Cradle to Career An Education Conversation.”

Leon Wiles, chief diversity officer at Clemson University and a former University of South Carolina Upstate vice chancellor, will serve as moderator. Panelists include Molly Talbot-Metz, vice president of programs at the Mary Black Foundation, Spartanburg Methodist College President Colleen P. Keith and Herb Johnson, Jr., vice president and chief diversity officer of Michelin North America. Other panelists include John Stockwell, executive director of Spartanburg Academic Movement and former chancellor of USC Upstate, Jil Littlejohn, president of the Urban League of the Upstate and Spartanburg District 7 Superintendent Russell Booker, who is also vice chairman of The Village Network.
If we are going to move the needle for graduation rates, then we need to focus on the African-American community,” Booker said. “This is a pretty strong and diverse panel. We wanted education to be the topic of our first forum. The event is open to everyone because it is going to take the entire community to make a difference.”

Booker said the education forum will outline programs available to help prepare children before they begin school and while they are in school. He also said the forum will help residents learn more about the importance of education.

“The idea is to share information and talk about the challenges of education,” Booker said. “This forum also will talk about the successes because that is just as important as talking about the challenges. There is so much going on that we want people to know what is happening in the community.”

Future plans are to hold discussions on health and wellness and financial planning. Organizers don’t plan to stop after offering a few forums. They hope to continue working on issues in the community and encourage other people to join them in the effort.

The Village Network organizers say their mission is “to unite a committed leadership base focused on educating, engaging and inspiring local families.” The other part of the vision is to focus attention on resources and programs that have the most potential in helping local families.

The Rev. Keith McDaniel, chairman of The Village Network and senior pastor of Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church, said he is excited about the group’s first event. He said members spent time looking at ways they could help others.

“We have too many families struggling with education, housing, health and other issues,” he said. “The village concept comes from the African proverb that it takes a village to raise a child, and we have applied that to leadership. It takes more than one leader to lead a community.”

IMG_0558

PSI BETA “Bullying and Its Effects” and “College Life” Presentation

On Wednesday, February 19, 2014 at 1 p.m., PSI BETA, the Honor Society in Psychology, had the special privilege and honor to visit with students from Carver Middle School. After touring SMC’s beautiful grounds and having had the rare chance of dining in the cafeteria with SMC students, the Carver 6th, 7th and 8th graders were treated to two (2) seminars presented by the PSI BETA Honor Society, “Bullying and Its Effects” and “College Life”. Led by Dr. Mary Jane Farmer, advisor, and the officers, PSI BETA talked about the definition and the three (3) types of bullying – verbal, social, and physical. They also talked about various statistical records and the effects of bullying. The experience was made more personal and relevant when each of the PSI BETA officers, together with a number of PSYC 101 students, shared their personal experiences on bullying. The closing seminar was on College Life. All of the college students present shared with their younger counterparts a simple yet essential message: in order to get to college, one must be focused and ambitious. Persistence, sacrifice, high motivation, choosing friends wisely and putting academics first, were also a few of the nuggets of wisdom that PSI BETA and the PSYC 101 students shared with the middle school students of Carver. It was a beautiful and a meaningful experience to all who attended.

SMC students featured in the photo include: Daniel “Bear” Berends (on the floor); from left (L) to right (R) are Kaitlyn Pless (Sec, PSI BETA), Leah Meahl, Matt Bishop, Dr Mary Jane Farmer (advisor, PSI BETA), Alexis Landrum, Jason Smith, Alex Wooden, Myia McClurkin, Alex Blanding, Ryan Gruver, Tierra Izzard (VP, PSI BETA), and Stevonna Jeter (President, PSI BETA). Not in picture, Grace Kopacz and Amichia Corcher.

Champ Squires

SMC announces Champ Squires Endowed Scholarship

Spartanburg Methodist College is pleased to announce the establishment of an endowed scholarship to honor Champ Squires, a 2013 graduate of SMC.

The Champ Squires Endowed Scholarship was established by the estate of Betty Stewart Parnell in memory of her sister, Margie Stewart Treadway.  Treadway was a graduate of the class of 1943 and a former member of the SMC Board of Trustees.  Awards will be made annually, in honor of Squires, to students who demonstrate academic promise and determination and who are physically impaired.

The Champ Squires Endowed Scholarship name was selected by the executors of the Parnell estate because “Champ Squires exemplifies everything the scholarship is intended to reward – his abilities, stamina, and courage overcame his physical shortcomings,” an estate spokesperson shared. “SMC’s administration and student body treated Squires wonderfully as a student and Squires speaks and sings to glorify the Lord.”

“I met with Champ and his mother on their very first visit to SMC. I had no idea that day how much he would impact my life and heart. Champ stood out from day one, not because of his disability, but because of his ability to show love and compassion in all that he did,” shared Kelly Tillinghast, SMC Admissions Counselor. “In his short time here, I believe Champ represented everything that SMC is about. He was a friend to all, an outstanding student and a natural born leader. Champ was known to stretch himself thin, but only because he wanted to be as involved as possible.”

Squires currently attends Southern Wesleyan University and plans to go into full-time ministry in family counseling  Squires is a member of Lewis Chapel UMC in Sumter. While at SMC, Squires was an active member in Chapel, an Ambassador for the Office of Admissions and was a member of the Troubadours, an auditioned choral ensemble, which performed challenging repertoire at local churches and various venues throughout South Carolina.

A committee appointed by SMC will select a qualified recipient or recipients each year and the award is renewable for a second year, upon achievement of academic success in the first year.

According to Don Tate, Director of Development for SMC, the Champ Squires Endowed Scholarship fund is open to receive additional contributions from other individuals or churches in the community to assist in the perpetuation of this award. “The benefits of such an award to qualifying students is life-changing – not only for the individual recipient but for those of us fortunate to be blessed by their gifts and talents,” Tate added.  Contributions to this fund should be made payable to SMC for: Champ Squires Fund and mailed to:  Office of Institutional Advancement, Spartanburg Methodist College, 1000 Powell Mill Rd, Spartanburg, SC  29301.

SMC Wrestling

Spartanburg Methodist College Wrestling Team Earns National Rankings

Spartanburg Methodist College learned today that two of their 2013-2014 Wrestling Team members are ranked in the top 10 for the Nation.  The SMC Pioneer Wrestling team, who went 7-3 overall this season, was also ranked 16th in the country.

According to the NJCAA and Intermat, SMC Freshman DeAndre Johnson, son of Angel Johnson, from Beaufort, is ranked 4th in the Nation.  Johnson is a graduate of Battery Creek High School.  Fellow team mate, also a freshman, Ian Clevenger, son of Mike and Brenda  Clevenger of Inman, SC, and a Boiling Springs High School graduate, is ranked 7th in the Nation

The SMC Wrestling Team is under the direction of Rob Sater, who is in his third season at the helm of the SMC Pioneer Wrestling program. Sater helped lead the Pioneers to their first ever winning season in 2012-2013. During his tenure at SMC, Sater has coached eleven national qualifiers and one All-American wrestler.

“I am extremely proud of how our young team has come together and pushed through adversity all season to produce the best dual meet record in school history. Ian and DeAndre are two young men that truly deserve the honor of being ranked nationally. They are hard workers on the mat and in the classroom, and exemplify what it means to be a student-athlete at Spartanburg Methodist College,” shared Coach Sater. “We have a few other individuals that are on track to finish high on the podium at nationals as well. I’m excited to be a part of such a special group of wrestlers and coaches. The sky is the limit for these guys if they wrestle up to their potential over the next three weeks.”

Sater originally served as Head Coach of the Boiling Springs High School Wrestling Team for the three seasons. Sater was the 2009 Spartanburg Herald Journal Coach of the Year, 2010 and 2011 BSH won the County Wrestling Tournament Championship (2010 was the first in school history). Sater (66-13 dual meet record) had 37 Upper-State qualifiers during his three years as head coach at BSHS. He coached five of the schools seven South Carolina All-State Wrestlers. He also had five freestyle/Greco national qualifiers.

Sater attended Division 1 Cleveland State University in Cleveland, Ohio for two years before transferring to and graduating with a BA in English from Limestone for his final two years. He wrestled at Limestone and was team captain for each year voted on by his teammates. Sater teaches English at BSHS.

Sater is assisted by his father, Bob Sater, who wrestled for Thiel College in Greenville, Pa where he was a Division III national qualifier in 1972.  The senior Sater returned to Madison HS in Madison Ohio to serve as an assistant coach for the first 14 years of his coaching career. He moved on to Perry HS to serve as their Head Wrestling Coach for the next 16 years. While serving in this position he was inducted into the Ohio Wrestling Coaches Hall of Fame Class of 2000. He was named the Ohio Wrestling Division III State Coach of the Year for the 2002 Wrestling Season.  He went on to serve as an Assistant Wrestling Coach for Cleveland State University (NCAA Division I) located in Cleveland, Ohio. He also served as an Assistant Wrestling Coach for Limestone College (NCAA Division II).

Humble Tip

Christian Rapper Humble Tip coming to SMC on Tuesday, February 11th

Righteous rhymes will ring out at Spartanburg Methodist College on Tuesday, February 11th  as they host a Christian Rap Concert featuring Humble Tip, Nick J and the SMC Gospel Choir.  The 7 p.m. event will be held in the Gibbs Auditorium, located in Ellis Hall on the campus of SMC.  The event is open to the public and admission is free.

Jason Lewis, aka Humble Tip, was born in Washington, D.C., and grew up in Capitol Heights, MD. Hip-hop music and culture were daily influences in this inner-city setting, but until college, Lewis never had any plans to enter the music industry.  “I never wanted to do this whole rap thing,” Lewis said. “I wanted to go to school and become a sports agent. I never, ever saw myself rapping.”

Unlike many of his peers, he was fortunate enough to grow up with both parents in his household. They taught their three children the importance of family, church and faith, factors which heavily influenced Lewis to attend Liberty University after high school.  While earning his degree in Health Promotions, he began writing basic lyrics after a DJ from Liberty University’s campus radio station 90.9 FM inspired him to try.

Although Lewis admits his first rhymes were horrible, he continued to develop his talents as a lyricist and eventually started rapping at on-campus events after his father all but forced him to take the stage for the first time. As others recognized his up-and-coming talent, he began creating CDs and music videos to share his passion.

“Especially in the hip-hop industry, everything is so materialistic. Everything is based off of financial wealth, pride, respect, sexuality,” Lewis said. “When you come up with something so anti-culture, sometimes it’s received well. A lot of the times it’s not.”

Armed with in-depth knowledge of God’s word, academic success, and a deep connection with and passion for this youthful generation, Humble Tip is determined and focused on making an impact on today’s culture.

Lewis holds an Undergraduate degree in Health Promotions and a Master’s Degree in Health and Wellness from Liberty University, and currently resides in Lynchburg, VA with his wife Essence.

Humble Tip’s clearly Christian lyrics and higher calling transform him into something larger-than-life on stage. When guests leave a Humble Tip concert they are excited about the Gospel.