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HOMECOMING/ALUMNI WEEKEND 2014 NOVEMBER 14-15

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Celebrate being a SMC Pioneer at Homecoming/Alumni Weekend 2014. This year there will be many on-campus events for the entire family to enjoy. SMC Homecoming/Alumni Weekend is the perfect time to reconnect with classmates, reminisce about your days at SMC, and celebrate your love for your alma mater. We will offer casual events to encourage alumni and family attendance. There will be fun events for everyone to enjoy throughout the day. Please note that the Alumni Awards Luncheon (formally a formal luncheon) will be casual and include picnic favorites. The picnic-style lunch will be held indoors, so don’t worry about the weather. You are welcome to dress causal so you can enjoy the on-campus events that will be offered the remainder of the day. Please make plans to attend – this is a weekend you don’t want to miss.

Friday, November 14th
7:00 – 8:00pm Womanless Beauty Pageant Ellis Hall, SMC Campus
8:00 – 10:00pm Alumni & Friends Decade Party Buffalo Wild Wings Patio, 1494 W O Ezell Blvd, Spartanburg, SC 29301

Saturday, November 15th
10:30-11:30am Registration & Silent Auction Fireplace Room, Burgess Student Center
11:30am-12:30pm *Alumni Awards Picnic Style Luncheon Fireplace Room, Burgess Student Center ($15 per person)
*(Casual Attire Welcome at the Alumni Awards Picnic Style Luncheon)
1:00 – 2:00pm Campus Tours and Class Reunions Various Campus Locations
1:00 – 5:00pm Family Fun Festivities Various Campus Locations
(Tethered Hot Air Balloon Rides, Mason Jar Decorating, Scavenger Hunt)
4:00pm Women’s Basketball Game Bridges Arena
6:00pm Men’s Basketball Game Bridges Arena
8:00pm Karaoke Sing-Off Ellis Hall, SMC Campus

For more information and to RSVP please contact
Becky Snow at SnowB@smcsc.edu or 864-587-4210.

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NY Mets Hall of Famer Mookie Wilson to headline SMC Founder’s Day Program

Spartanburg Methodist College is pleased to announce NY Mets Hall of Fame member Mookie Wilson will be the featured speaker at the College’s 2014 Founder’s Day Program on Thursday, October 23 at 6 pm. in the Gibbs Auditorium. A reception and autograph session will follow and the general public is invited to attend.

SMC’s Student Government Association presents the Founder’s Day program each October celebrating the vision, passion, and purpose of SMC’s pioneering founder, Dr. David English Camak, a visionary Methodist minister. Wilson, who graduated from SMC in April of 1976 with an Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts, played all or part of twelve seasons in Major League Baseball for the New York Mets (1980–89) and Toronto Blue Jays (1989–91).

During SMC’s September 10 Convocation, Greenville native, Adell Enrique Gordon, graduate of Berea High School and the son of Revs. Enrique and Shirley Gordon, was sworn into office as SGA President. Gordon shared “A pioneer, in the simplest form, is an ordinary person who does extraordinary things. Without question, Mookie Wilson is just that.”
The Major League Baseball outfielder and coach is best remembered as the Met that hit the ground ball that trickled through Bill Buckner’s legs in game six of the 1986 World Series. Wilson avoided being hit by a wild pitch, allowing the tying run to score in the bottom of the 10th. His ground ball later in the same at bat went through the legs of Red Sox first baseman Bill Buckner, allowing the winning run to score. The play is often known as the “Buckner play” and is blamed on the first baseman, but Wilson’s smart at bat, speed, and determination also affected the course of events and allowed the Mets to win the1986 World Series. The ball that rolled through Buckner’s legs was long housed in the Seth Swirsky baseball collection and on May 3, 2012, was sold through Heritage Auctions for $418,250.

Born William Hayward Wilson, and nicknamed “Mookie” as a small child, in Bamberg, SC, he pitched for the Bamberg-Ehrhardt High School Red Raiders baseball team under legendary coach David Horton. While attending SMC, he was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the fourth round of the January 1976 amateur draft, but he did not sign. Instead, he transferred to play for The University of South Carolina Gamecocks, preferring to take the chance of skipping the 1976 draft offer and increasing his draft stock by playing for former New York Yankees great, and fellow South Carolina native Bobby Richardson (who was the head coach of the Gamecocks at the time).

The gamble paid-off as Wilson was selected in the second round of the 1977 Major League Baseball Draft by the NY Mets. A switch hitter with excellent speed, his positive attitude and hustle immediately endeared him to a New York Mets fan base and was enshrined in the NY Mets Hall of Fame in 1996. From 1996-2002, Wilson served as the Mets’ first base coach. In 2003 and 2004, he managed the Rookie League Kingsport Mets team, and in 2005, Wilson managed the single-A Brooklyn Cyclones. After serving as the organization’s base running coordinator, Wilson returned to serve as the Mets’ first base coach in 2011. He moved into a front office job after the season. In 2013, he managed the U.S. Team in the All-Star Futures Game held at Citi Field.

Wilson never strayed from the lessons he learned at SMC that encouraged academic excellence, intellectual exploration, social awareness, and character development. Shortly after his classic time at bat in the sixth game of the 1986 World Series, Wilson and his wife Rosa started an educational center for girls, Mookie’s Roses, near their home in Lakewood, NJ. In 1996, Wilson earned a bachelor’s degree from Mercy College in New York. In 2001, Mookie and his family released a gospel CD entitled, “Don’t Worry, the Lord will Carry You Through.” Wilson most recently appeared on the April 28, 2014 episode of The Daily Show to discuss his memoir, “Mookie: Life, Baseball, and the ’86 Mets” (2014).

During the Thursday, October 23 program, the first annual SGA Founder’s Day Faculty Award will also be presented to a faculty member who represents and embodies the spirit and vision of Dr. Camak. The recipient is one who is not afraid to try new things, puts the needs of students first, and is respected in their profession and by the student body. SMC welcomes the general public to attend this uplifting program. For more information, please contact Yvonne Harper, harpery@smcsc.edu, 864-587-4278.

SMC Paralegal Program celebrating Governor’s Proclamation

The Paralegal Certificate Evening Program at Spartanburg Methodist College is pleased to report that Tuesday October 14, 2014 has been declared PARALEGAL DAY in the State of South Carolina by Governor Nikki Haley.

The Governor’s Proclamation states that whereas, paralegals have the skill, education, and training to provide support to attorneys in a variety of areas including legal research, document preparation, and file maintenance; and whereas, working in law firms, corporations, government agencies, and other organizations, paralegals contribute to lower counsel fees, improved management of cases, and greater cost containment for clients; and whereas, demonstrating a high level of achievement, responsibility, dedication, and integrity, paralegals across South Carolina uphold the highest standards of professionalism; and whereas, Paralegal Day provides an opportunity to recognize paralegals throughout the Palmetto State for the role they play in an efficient and effective legal system.

Governor Haley’s proclamation encourages all South Carolinians to honor paralegals for their many contributions to the availability of quality legal services.

“Paralegals provide critical and integral support to attorneys and have established themselves to be an indispensable workforce within the legal system since the 1960s,” stated to Yvonne Harper, director of the SMC Paralegal Certificate Evening Program, who prior to moving to SC, served for over thirteen years as a litigation and bankruptcy paralegal in Virginia. “The paralegal profession continues to be among the fastest growing of any profession in the nation. Employers are reducing costs and increasing the availability and efficiency of legal services by hiring paralegals to perform tasks once done by lawyers. Paralegals are also performing a wider variety of duties, making them useful to even non-legal businesses.”

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of paralegals and legal assistants is projected to grow 28 percent between 2008 and 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. In fact, in the coming years, paralegals may have more career opportunity than attorneys, stenographers —even federal judges. The latest job rating survey at the CareerCast job portal ranked 200 different jobs based on five vital work criteria: stress, work environment, physical demands, income and outlook. While “lawyer” came in 82nd on the list of 200 best jobs and “federal judges” 69th, “paralegal assistants” made the top 20—ranking 17th overall. CNNMoney.com ranked the paralegal profession 14th in the Top 20 jobs for “people who want more pay, more upside and more control over where they’re going.”

“SMC provides adult students convenient evening hours of instruction, reasonable tuition and real-time learning with quality legal faculty, composed of local judges, practicing attorneys and paralegals, who provide networking opportunities and offer real-world experience with practical application,” Harper stated. “In the past 10 years at SMC, I have had the pleasure of assisting adult students with no-college, some-college, college graduates, as well as multiple students with advanced degrees (Masters and even Doctorate) receive the education they needed for the legal career they wanted,” said Harper, who added, “all had one thing in common, they wanted to work in a profession that valued their contributions!”

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Northern Border Blue Grass bringing “Old Time” music to SMC – Wednesday, October 15

NBBGNorthern Border Blue Grass will be bringing old time music to the Spartanburg Methodist College campus on Wednesday, October 15. The 7 p.m. event will be held in the Gibbs Auditorium, located in Ellis Hall on the campus of SMC. The event is open to the public and admission is free.

Northern Border, named “Best Upstate Bluegrass Band” in competition and performance at Twichell Auditorium on the Converse College campus, had its beginnings on the campus of Wofford College in 1961 as part of the late Professor Sam Moyer’s choral program. The band’s name is derived from the first line of the Wofford College Alma Mater “On the city’s northern border….” The band leans heavily on the traditional mountain sound featuring three and four part harmonies and driving instrumentals from the five-string banjo and the mandolin. They also feature a variety of musical Americana from Steve Goodman to the Everly Brothers.

The members of Northern Border come from a variety of backgrounds ranging from concert to rock and roll, all returning to the traditionally voiced music of the mountains. The players include Steve Campbell of Greer, S.C.; Greg Farmer of Spartanburg, S.C.; Tom Bratton of Gaffney, S.C. and Milton Smith of Woodruff, S.C.

“Old Time Music at its Best” describes Campbell, who is one of the finest and most respected five-string players in the region. A veteran of bands “Southbound”, Flint Hill”, “Dakota’’ and “Mountain View”, he brings his extraordinary talents on banjo, guitar and dobro to Northern Border. A versatile vocalist, he sings lyric tenor lines as well as the bass part.

Farmer is a Michigan native, a physical therapist by vocation and an excellent singer and musician, bringing his vocal talents as well as his talents on the mandolin, guitar and fiddle to Northern Border. He displays his passion for the old time music every time he hits the stage and was named “one of the top five bluegrass musicians in the state” by “Living in South Carolina” magazine.
Bratton is a fine upright bass player and story teller who handles vocal arrangements for the group. As an All-State and orchestra trombone player, he naturally sings the baritone line as well as the lead part and has a “steel trap mind” when it comes to lyrics.

Smith sings lead and baritone parts and plays rhythm guitar. After traveling for many years as a horn player in contemporary music, he returned to the traditional music which is his first love. He has worked with the late Nashville producer and five-string banjo genius Bobby Thompson and handles logistic for the band.

Northern Border has recorded five albums: “Prisoner’s Song”, “Friends Forever”, “Pickin’ on the Back Porch”, “Live at the Pickin’ at Pickens” and “Nailing It!” and their appearance schedule includes TV, radio, and a variety of festivals, concerts and events including the North Carolina BBQ Festival, the South and North Carolina Seafood Festivals, the Atlanta Folk Festival, the Highlands, N.C. Folk Festival and the South Carolina Juried Arts Festival at Atalaya Castle in Huntington Beach State Park.

Make plans to experience Northern Border on Wednesday, October 15. The 7 p.m. concert is open to the public and admission is free of charge. The Gibbs Auditorium in Ellis Hall is handicapped accessible. Take advantage of this free community concert to learn about the distinct qualities of local blue grass! For additional information, contact Yvonne Harper, harpery@smcsc.edu, 864-587-4278 or 266-7409.

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SMC to feature Rabbi Yossi Liebowitz @ Judaism Seminar

The Social Sciences Department at Spartanburg Methodist College will host Rabbi Yossi Liebowitz on Thursday, October 23. The 4 p.m. seminar on Judaism will be held in the Davis Mission Chapel on the campus of SMC and is open to the public as well as the campus community.

Rabbi Liebowitz was born in Brooklyn, New York, holds a masters in Hebrew letters and has received two honorary doctorates. He recently completed his thirtieth year in the rabbinate and has served in pulpits in New York state and on the West Coast. Rabbi Liebowitz has completed his eighth year with Congregation B’nai Israel, located on Heywood Avenue in Spartanburg, which has proudly served the Jewish community of Spartanburg and surrounding areas for more than one-hundred years.

Judaism, the monotheistic (belief in one God) religion of the Jewish people, was established circa 2000 B.C.E. as part of a covenant between God and Abraham. Uprisings against the Romans during the first and second centuries A.D. led to the beginning of the Jewish diaspora. Those practicing Judaism were kept marginalized from society and persecuted in many countries. The creation of a Jewish state was discussed at the first Zionist Congress in Switzerland in 1897, yet it was not until May 18, 1948 that the state of Israel was formed after World War II and the genocide of over six million Jewish people.

Judaism falls into four major periods: Biblical Judaism, or the Persian Period (approximately 20th-4th century BCE); Hellenistic Judaism (4th century BCE-2nd century CE), a time of Greek and Roman influence in many religions; Rabbinic Judaism (2nd-18th century CE) based on the Talmud; and Modern Judaism (approximately 1750-present). According to the American Jewish Year Book, the core Jewish population includes people who identify as Jews by religion and others who are not interested in religion but see themselves as Jews by ethnicity or other cultural criteria. There are an estimated 13,854,800 Jews in the World, an estimated 43.4% in Israel and 39.2% in the United States. According to the Pew Research Center, 4.2 million (or 1.8% of the adult population in the United States) are Jewish by religion.

Rabbi Liebowitz supports a wide number of interests, including digging for dinosaur fossils, Science Fiction and Music. His interfaith musical duo with Pastor Paul Harmon “The cap and the collar” has performed at over forty venues from Churches and Temples to concert halls. He has taught at the university level for many years and currently teaches at Converse College and University of South Carolina Upstate. Rabbi Liebowitz is married and has four children ages 31, 27, 22 and 12.

According to Dr. Cole Cheek, SMC Professor of History and Anthropology, “We welcome this opportunity to explore common questions about Judaism with our students. Is Judaism a race, a religion or a nationality?” Dr. Cheek went on to elaborate that “it is my wish that students walk away with an understanding and appreciation of the Jewish society and the relationships among individuals within that society.”

Math with the Simpsons

SMC to present Math Morsels from the Simpsons to Futurama on Monday, October 6

“The Simpsons” is an award-winning global pop culture phenomenon. But did you know that “The Simpsons” also contains over one hundred mathematical moments, with material ranging from arithmetic to calculus to Riemannian geometry? There’s even a resident mathematician/inventor, Professor Frink.

Spartanburg Methodist College invites you to join us as we host Dr. Sarah Greenwald and she presents some of our favorite mathematical excerpts from “The Simpsons,” and explores the related mathematical content, accuracy and pedagogical value. The 7 p.m. event will be held in the Gibbs Auditorium, located in Ellis Hall on the campus of SMC. The event is open to the public and admission is free.

Greenwald is a professor in the Department of Mathematics and a Women’s Studies core faculty member at Appalachian State University in the northwestern mountains of North Carolina. She is the winner of a 2005 MAA Alder Award for distinguished teaching, the 2010 Appalachian State University Wayne D. Duncan Award for Excellence in Teaching in General Education, and the 2011 College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Teacher of the Year. In 2010 she was inducted into the Appalachian State University College of Arts and Sciences Academy of Outstanding Teachers. She has co-edited the 3-volume Encyclopedia of Mathematics & Society, which was named a “Best Reference 2011″ by Library Journal.

Dr. Greenwald received her Ph.D. from the Department of Mathematics at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and B.S. in math from the Department of Mathematics at Union College in Schenectady, NY.

Spartanburg Methodist College’s Gibbs Auditorium in Ellis Hall is handicapped accessible. Educators and students from the community are encouraged to take advantage of this free presentation to learn a few math morsels! For additional information, contact Yvonne Harper, harpery@smcsc.edu, 864-587-4278 or 266-7409.

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SMC shares “Why You and Your Student Should Visit Colleges!”

A campus visit is an opportunity to get a personal view of a college and life on that campus.  College catalogs, brochures or websites can only show you so much. To really get a feel for a college, you need to walk around the quad, sit in on a class, review the student newspaper, activity calendar and bulletin boards and visit the residence halls.

The importance of visiting college campuses cannot be over emphasized.Walking around the campus can give you a feel for what a college is really like and help you find a good fit where you can be successful,” stressed Mike Queen, Director of Admissions and Enrollment Marketing at SMC.

According to Queen, there are two kinds of visits: one is the “drive-by” informal visit that can begin early in the college search.  This type of visit can be made without a lot of hype and pressure and does not have to be the college to which the student will eventually apply. With a little planning the visit can be a welcome side trip during a vacation with the opportunity to walk around, see the facilities, eat in the cafeteria and visit the bookstore. This can be a very low-key, non-stress way of experiencing many different colleges and universities for the whole family, including younger siblings. You also can take advantage of campus tours and information sessions. The differences between campuses will soon become clear to all. If you are not able to travel long distances to visit this is an ideal way to get the feel of a small liberal arts school in a small town or rural area or a large metropolitan university with the city for a campus.

The second type of visit is the more formal visit, and is appropriate for seniors who have narrowed down the list of schools. It is best to visit when the college is in session and students are on campus. The visit should include a campus information session, a campus tour and time to simply wander around the campus. This gives potential students the chance to talk to actual students, faculty, coaches, financial aid and admission officers in person, sit in on classes, and see inside residence halls where the student might live.  (Campuses generally have residency requirements: specific halls for males, females, athletes, honor students, etc.)  Plus it allows answers to important questions regarding class size, instructors, meal plans, clubs and other student organization activities available.

Although visiting colleges may not be possible for everyone, it’s a good idea to make the trips, if you can.  Parents and other family members can participate in visits and informational sessions, and are great sounding boards for discussing the visit on the trip back home. Queen suggests creating a checklist to remind you of everything you want to do and see once you get on campus and make sure to allow plenty of time to explore and be sure and ask your tour guide or students you meet on campus: Why did you choose this college?  What do you love about this college?

Spending time on a campus helps you determine whether a college is a good personal fit.  SMC sophomore Sam Blackwelder, member of Kingstree United Methodist Church, Kingstree, SC, shared “I immediately felt comfortable and at home. I clicked with the students and the faculty.  SMC is everything I imaged college to be!”

A campus visit not only will help to narrow down the choices but it can have benefits such as acting as a real motivator for the student to do well academically as well as in extracurricular activities. Visits give a clearer picture about the college environment and it can act as an ideal opportunity for parents and students to talk about this very important decision. Ultimately, it’s your and your student’s decision. Listen to your heart.

Humble Tip

Christian Rapper Humble Tip coming to SMC on Tuesday, September 23rd

Righteous rhymes will ring out at Spartanburg Methodist College on Tuesday, September 23 as they host a Christian Rap Concert featuring Humble Tip. The 7 p.m. event will be held in the Gibbs Auditorium, located in Ellis Hall on the campus of SMC. The event is open to the public and admission is free.

Jason Lewis, aka Humble Tip, was born in Washington, D.C., and grew up in Capitol Heights, MD. Hip-hop music and culture were daily influences in this inner-city setting, but until college, Lewis never had any plans to enter the music industry. “I never wanted to do this whole rap thing,” Lewis said. “I wanted to go to school and become a sports agent. I never, ever saw myself rapping.”

Unlike many of his peers, he was fortunate enough to grow up with both parents in his household. They taught their three children the importance of family, church and faith, factors which heavily influenced Lewis to attend Liberty University after high school. While earning his degree in Health Promotions, he began writing basic lyrics after a DJ from Liberty University’s campus radio station 90.9 FM inspired him to try.

Although Lewis admits his first rhymes were horrible, he continued to develop his talents as a lyricist and eventually started rapping at on-campus events after his father all but forced him to take the stage for the first time. As others recognized his up-and-coming talent, he began creating CDs and music videos to share his passion.
“Especially in the hip-hop industry, everything is so materialistic. Everything is based off of financial wealth, pride, respect, sexuality,” Lewis said. “When you come up with something so anti-culture, sometimes it’s received well. A lot of the times it’s not.”

Armed with in-depth knowledge of God’s word, academic success, and a deep connection with and passion for this youthful generation, Humble Tip is determined and focused on making an impact on today’s culture. Lewis holds an Undergraduate degree in Health Promotions and a Master’s Degree in Health and Wellness from Liberty University, and currently resides in Lynchburg, VA with his wife Essence.

Humble Tip’s clearly Christian lyrics and higher calling transform him into something larger-than-life on stage. When guests leave a Humble Tip concert they are excited about the Gospel. Make plans to join us on Tuesday, September 23. The 7 p.m. concert is open to the public and admission is free of charge. The Gibbs Auditorium in Ellis Hall is handicapped accessible. Take advantage of this free community concert to learn about the distinct qualities of Christian Rap! For additional information, contact Yvonne Harper, harpery@smcsc.edu, 864-587-4278 or 266-7409.

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Dr. Ed Ellis Portrait Unveiling

On Wednesday, September 10, 2014 SMC faculty, staff, students, family and friends of Drs. Ed and Charlotte Ellis gathered together after SMC’s Convocation for a very special event to recognize Dr. Ed Ellis for all he and his wife continue to do for the College. SMC unveiled the portrait, created by artist Trish Lowe, that will hang in Ellis Hall.

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College Town partners with Live on the Green to sponsor QUINN SULLIVAN and BRUCE HORNSBY

College Town announced today that it has partnered with Live On the Green LLC to present the inaugural Live on the Green concert, featuring Bruce Hornsby and Quinn Sullivan, on Saturday, September 20, 2014, at Barnet Park in downtown Spartanburg.
College Town Live on the Green Poster

“College Town’s participation in this upcoming concert provides a terrific cultural opportunity for all of our faculty, staff and students and helps to energizes downtown Spartanburg. We are so proud of the growing vitality of the Spartanburg community,” shared Betsy Fleming, Converse College President, and current chair of College Town, a consortium of the seven colleges in Spartanburg (Converse College, Sherman College, Spartanburg Methodist College, Spartanburg Community College, University of South Carolina Upstate, Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine and Wofford College).

15-year-old blues guitarist, Quinn Sullivan, will open for legendary performer Bruce Hornsby, who will perform solo on the piano. Sullivan is quickly gaining quite a reputation among today’s most respected guitar players and musical artists. He has been touring the world with his mentor and friend, Buddy Guy, promoting his latest CD, “Getting There,” produced in Nashville with multi-Grammy winner Tom Hambridge. Since the age of seven, Quinn has been sharing stages with legendary players like Eric Clapton, BB King, and Buddy Guy at iconic venues like the Hollywood Bowl, Madison Square Garden, and Red Rocks. He has also performed at some of the world’s most prestigious festivals including Montreux Jazz, Austin City Limits, and Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival. “Quinn is undoubtedly one of the best blues guitarists of any age on the planet. His talent and repertoire will be the perfect complement to Bruce Hornsby’s performance,” stated Ben Graves, member of the Live on the Green executive committee.“

Tickets for Live on the Green are available for $10 to all faculty, staff and students with presentation of a valid College ID. General Admission is $20 ($27 at gate, day of event). Gold Circle Level seating is $35 with limited availability. Tickets are currently on sale and can be purchased through the event website, www.spartanburgonthegreen.com. Rain location will be the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium.

Live on the Green was created by a group of young, business-minded individuals with a vision for Spartanburg as a more viable location for live music events. The organization chose Barnet Park as the event location in order to utilize the prominent Spartanburg space for its intended purpose. The event is being supported by sponsors throughout the community, including the City of Spartanburg. All funds are held and directed by the Spartanburg County Foundation. The event will be produced by Seven Hills Presents, a Virginia-based event production company.

Kaityln Pless websize photo

SMC instilling Leadership, Service and a Strong Work Ethic

SMC’s founder, Methodist minister Rev. Dr. David English Camak, had a vision to improve the lives of the men and women living and working in the Mill Villages of Spartanburg. His goal was to provide an education that would enlighten textile workers and enable them to overcome the social forces that threatened their lives and future generations. Camak believed that these young men and women were ambitious and, with the right training and encouragement, had the potential to become influential leaders in their community and industry.

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It is appropriate, therefore, to pause and recall both Camak’s vision and pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.

Spartanburg Methodist College continues to believe in the same vision and values, which served as guiding principles and the foundation for the college over 103 years ago. For the SMC community, the yearly national labor day tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country, is an ongoing observance and celebration and is echoed in their motto, To Be & To Do.

As part of the UM connection, SMC strives to develop a values-oriented atmosphere where students can develop a sensitivity to the needs of others. Each year, on the first full day that freshman are on the SMC campus, they are sent out into the Spartanburg community to help churches, schools, and non-profit agencies with landscaping, cleaning and organizing, feeding the hungry, working with the elderly, and easing the plight of the homeless. Kappa Sigma Alpha, SMC’s only fraternity, is dedicated to community service and participate in bimonthly service opportunities. SMC students are also invited to participate in Alternative Fall and Spring Breaks, led by the Dean of Students and the Chaplain, in which they are exposed to the multitude of needs found in a community. Students might work to improve the housing of low-income elderly residents, assist on a farm for recovering and retired horses, sort linens for a ministry that provides beds for children who would otherwise be sleeping on the floor, tutor children, work with nursing home residents, etc.

Students like Kaitlyn Pless, a 2014 graduate of SMC, who graduated Valedictorian of her high school class, report that SMC gives “access to knowledge beyond the walls of home and school. Volunteering my labor led me educationally towards a career and provided a gateway into the knowledge of theology, philosophy, and the history of Faith.”

Kaitlyn, who is actively involved in youth leadership at Sharon UM Greer, is currently enrolled in the University of South Carolina Upstate’s Mary Black School of Nursing for her BSN. She hopes to specialize in Hospice Care.

Martin Luther King, Jr. is quoted to have said “All labor that uplifts humanity has dignity and importance and should be undertaken with painstaking excellence.” During the 2013-2014 academic year, Candice Y. Sloan, SMC Chaplin, proudly reported that SMC students, faculty and staff provided over 6,008 hours of volunteer labor to the community. SMC…doing all the good they can, by all the means they can, in all the ways they can, in all the places they can, at all the times they can, to all the people they can.

Liz Patterson

SMC Trustee the Honorable Liz Patterson was honored by the Spartanburg County Democrats

Yet another example of Pioneer Pride! SMC Trustee the Honorable Liz Patterson was honored by the Spartanburg County Democrats at an event last night for her service as an elected official. Please join me in congratulating Liz!
The link to the story is here: http://www.goupstate.com/article/20140828/ARTICLES/140829607/1112?Title=Former-congresswoman-honored-at-fundraiser-

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SMC product coaches Chicago team to Little League World Series Final

Some of you probably have been caught up in Little League World Series fever the past few days. I know I have. But get this: There are 7,000 Little League teams and the one coached by SMC alum Darold Butler (played for us  in 1997 and 1998, teammate of Orlando Hudson, coached by Tim Wallace) won the U.S. title and finished second in the world! How’s that for Pioneer Pride?! ROLL NEERS!! Link to a story about Mr. Butler is below:

Darold Butler was a little guy who came from the streets of Chicago and did big things on the baseball diamond for Spartanburg Methodist College.

Read more..

http://www.goupstate.com/article/20140823/ARTICLES/140829864/1088?Title=SMC-product-coaches-Chicago-team-to-LLWS-final